Calcium for Bones

Milk is touted to build strong bones, but a compilation of all the best studies found no association between milk consumption and hip fracture risk; so, drinking milk as an adult might not help bones, but what about in adolescence? Harvard researchers decided to put it to the test.

Studies have shown that greater milk consumption during childhood and adolescence contributes to peak bone mass, and is therefore expected to help avoid osteoporosis and bone fractures in later life. Milk consumption during teenage years was not associated with a lower risk of hip fracture, and if anything, milk consumption was associated with a borderline increase in fracture risk in men.

It appears that the extra boost in total body bone mineral density from getting extra calcium is lost within a few years, even if you keep the calcium supplementation up. This suggests a partial explanation for the long-standing enigma that hip fracture rates are highest in populations with the greatest milk consumption. This may be an explanation for why they’re not lower, but why would they be higher...

A hundred thousand men and women were followed for up to 20 years. Researchers found that milk-drinking women had higher rates of death, more heart disease, and significantly more cancer for each glass of milk. Three glasses a day was associated with nearly twice the risk of premature death, and they had significantly more bone and hip fractures. More milk, more fractures.

Men in a separate study also had a higher rate of death with higher milk consumption, but at least they didn’t have higher fracture rates. So, the researchers found a dose dependent higher rate of both mortality and fracture in women, and a higher rate of mortality in men with milk intake, but the opposite for other dairy products like soured milk and yogurt, since bacteria can ferment away some of the lactose. To prove it though, we need a randomized controlled trial to examine the effect of milk intake on mortality and fractures. As the accompanying editorial pointed out, we better find this out soon, since milk consumption is on the rise around the world.

What can we do for our bones, then? Weight-bearing exercise such as jumping, weight-lifting, and walking with a weighted vest or backpack may help, along with getting enough calcium (Alkaline Diets, Animal Protein, & Calcium Loss) and vitamin D (Resolving the Vitamin D-Bate). Eating beans (Phytates for the Prevention of Osteoporosis) and avoiding phosphate additives (Phosphate Additives in Meat Purge and Cola) may also help.

— Nutritional Facts, Michael Greger M.D. FACLM, January 31st, 2017


Watermelon

"Watermelon is one of the most refreshing, thirst quenching fruit available year round. Watermelon is not only delicious but also very nutritious. Studies have shown that deep red varieties of watermelon have displaced the tomato as the lycopene king.

Lycopene, however, is fat-soluble, meaning that it needs certain fats in the blood for better absorption by the body. Watermelon consists of 92% water and 8% sugar.

Benefits of eating watermelon daily:

Achieve that younger-looking skin with just 2-cups of watermelon daily. Research showed that watermelon cuts the risk of sun related skin damage by 40%. That's because watermelon is nature's richest source of lycopene, an antioxidant that scavenges the UV-induced free radicals that cause sunburn and wrinkling. Lycopene may also help reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases.

 Watermelon can help improve sleep. By eating a few slices of this fruit after dinner can extend the deep stages of sleep by 27%. The reason is watermelon's polysaccharide carbohydrates revive the body's output of serotonin. When levels of serotonin increase at night, the brain is less sensitive to disruptive stimuli (like noise) during sleep.

Watermelon can boost energy. A daily serving of watermelon has been shown to boost energy levels by up to 23%. This is because watermelon contains vitamin B6, which the body uses to synthesize feel good dopamine. It also contains magnesium which assists in the body's formation of adenosine triphosphate. Like a rechargeable battery, this nucleotide fuels cellular function for all-day energy.

Watermelon can help in the faster healing of wound and other skin problem. The fruit is packed with the amino acid citrulline, which the body converts to arginine. Arginine speeds the delivery of white blood cells to injury sites, plus spurs the growth of new skin tissue. Study show that these processes can help skin heal 3x faster.

Watermelon has ingredient (arginine) that deliver Viagra-like effect. Arginine boosts nitric oxide, which relaxes blood vessels, the same basic effect that Viagra has, to treat erectile dysfunction and maybe even prevent it. Extra nitric oxide can also help treat angina, high blood pressure and other cardiovascular problems.

Tips for a juicier watermelon slices: Long-term refrigeration can sap nutrients and flavor from the fruit. But to guarantee the tastiest fruit, place watermelon in the fridge for 30 minutes before slicing it. A quick chill causes the fruit's cells to constrict. This means the juice stays in the slices instead of running out onto the cutting board".

—hubpages.com

Recipe - Nut Milk/Butter


½ - 4 c  water                ¼ t  salt

1 c  nuts or seeds          flavouring
    
Blend all ingredients until smooth as desired.

Milk
For flavouring, add honey, vanilla, fruits, carob or maple syrup. Blend with one to two cups water until smooth, then add remainder of water and blend again. For milk, use 4 cups of water.

Cream
For cream, use 2 cups water and the same flavours as milk. May add leftover cereal (such as porridge or rice) to make it more thick and creamy.

Butter
For butter, use ½-1 cup water and onion or garlic for savoury flavour. May add a pinch of turmeric or other yellow colouring.
Note: Use sunflower seeds, almonds, cashews or any other nuts or seeds of your choice.