Meat Components May Raise Bladder Cancer Risk

Research continues to uncover benefits and dangers of many aspects of our lives. Our food is certainly one item of our daily lives that often comes under close scrutiny. Much research of recent years has focused on meat-eating and its effects on our health and longevity. Well, a new study has just been released and it gives yet more information.

This new study suggests that consuming specific compounds in meat related to processing methods may be associated with an increased risk of developing bladder cancer. Published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may be relevant for understanding the role of dietary exposures in cancer risk. Eating red and processed meats has been linked to an increased risk of developing several different types of cancer. Animal studies have identified a number of compounds in meat that might account for this association. These include heterocyclic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and N-nitroso compounds. Nitrate and nitrite are added to processed meats and are known precursors to N-nitroso compounds.

Amanda J. Cross, PhD, of the National Cancer Institute in Rockville and colleagues conducted one of the first prospective studies -- the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study -- to assess the relationship between intake of these meat-related compounds and the risk of developing bladder cancer. They used information gathered through questionnaires to assess the types of meat consumed as well as how meat was prepared and cooked to estimate the intake of these meat-related compounds.

The investigators had information from approximately 300,000 men and women aged 50 to 71 years from eight US states. At the start of the study (1995 to 1996), all participants completed lifestyle and dietary questionnaires about their usual consumption of foods and drinks. The participants were followed for up to eight years, during which time 854 people were diagnosed with bladder cancer.

People whose diets had the highest amount of total dietary nitrite (from all sources and not just from meat), as well as those whose diets had the highest amount of nitrate plus nitrite from processed meats had a 28 percent to 29 percent increased risk of developing bladder cancer compared with those who consumed the lowest amount of these compounds. This association between nitrate/nitrite consumption and bladder cancer risk may explain why other studies have observed an association between processed meats and increased bladder cancer risk.

"Our findings highlight the importance of studying meat-related compounds to better understand the association between meat and cancer risk," said Dr. Cross. "Comprehensive epidemiologic data on meat-related exposures and bladder cancer are lacking; our findings should be followed up in other prospective studies," she added.

~American Cancer Society (2010, August 2). Certain meat components may increase bladder cancer risk, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 4, 2010, from http://www.sciencedaily.com­ /releases/2010/08/100802073941.htm


Parsley

a Natural Vitamin and Mineral Supplement

Many people are familiar with parsley as the green sprig that decorates many restaurant meals. But the truth is: that little green sprig packs some powerful health benefits. In fact, parsley is packed with so many nutrients that eating it is almost like taking a multi-vitamin and mineral supplement - one that's all natural and available at a fraction of the cost.

Here's some of what parsley can do: Parsley builds blood, aids in digestion, boosts energy, combats fatigue, helps the heart, dissolves cholesterol in the veins, supports the adrenals, strengthens teeth, builds bones, prevents birth defects, enhances nutrient absorption, eliminates bloating, reduces inflammation, and provides hormonal support. Parsley is well known for helping or solving most kidney problems and also provides general immune support.

Parsley is a high-chlorophyll blood purifier that aids in detoxification, particularly of the kidneys but also of the liver. And the herb packs in dense nutrients including: vitamin A, vitamin C, beta carotene, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, manganese, potassium, folic acid, sulfur, vitamin K, and B vitamins 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6. Parsley is even rumored to contain trace amounts of B12.

Parsley also contains unique volatile oils that inhibit tumors - particularly in the lungs. These oils are able to neutralize some airborne carcinogens, including some of those found in cigarette smoke and smoke from charcoal grilling. Neutralizing these airborne poisons may be why parsley helps prevent lung tumors.

To really get the immune building, nutrient fortifying, and detoxification benefits, you'll want to take parsley in some quantity. To do this, it's best to juice or blend it with other fruits or vegetables. With any fruit, you can also add a bit of stevia for extra sweetness.

~NaturalNews, August 3 2010, by Kim Evans, citizen journalist

Recipe of the Month

4 Parsley Drinks

Here are some easy, delicious recipes to enjoy a healthy dose:

• Blend: 1 1/2 cups watermelon (seeded), 1/4 cup parsley, 1/2 cup water and a bit of stevia. It's a delicious, nutritious drink that even your children will enjoy.

• Blend: 1/2 papaya, 1 banana, 1/4 cup parsley, 1/2 cup water and a bit of stevia

• Juice 3 apples and a 1/2 cup parsley

• Juice: 4 carrots, 1/2 apple and a 1/2 cup parsley

Pregnant women should avoid taking parsley in quantity.